Burswood premium continues

PropertyESP will be releasing a media statement this week after examining the Burswood apartment market from 2013-2017.

While overall the median price for apartments in this locale has grown by 11% from $700,000 to $780,000, it is the fact that this growth has occurred across all bedroom configurations that makes it even more interesting.

One bedroom increased its median price point by 6% in these four years, two bedroom 17%, three bedroom 14.5% and four bedroom 8%.  This contrasts to other apartment nodes nearby.

Plus in this time frame only 16 properties resold and when you see property being held onto this tightly then there tends to be an indication of high satisfaction and a sense that more growth is anticipated.

The sales data also demonstrated Burswoods’ preference for larger apartments with 21% three bedroom apartments sold in the four years, in comparison to its counterpart in Rivervale which sold just 13%.

There are calls from some Councils that apartments in fact can dilute the premium brand of a suburb – but in this case it is quite clear that Burswood not only has established this solid reputation but also maintained it.

Plus with the Stadium finishing and the Burswood Peninsula Precinct Plan on the horizon, this suburb will only continue to grow in value.

If you like the way we look at data – then let us have a look at your suburb.  Unlike Eastern States companies, PropertyESP gets into the nitty gritty and we look at the long term – not just the last quarter.  Because the devil is in the detail!

 

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Night time economy part of WA’s future

With all the inner city development occurring, a colleague of PropertyESP recently attended the Australian Night Time Economy (NTE) conference in Melbourne.

This conference dealt with the fact that the night time economy, which for so long has been associated with bars, restaurants and adult entertainment in fact was evolving and in the UK this economy represented $66 billion in trade alone (or 6% of GDP).

Closer to home, Brisbane’s NTE grew by 25.2% from 2009-2014 from $4.97 billion to $6.231 billion.

With changing work habits, multicultural diversity and in fact a 24 hour global clock, we are less and less inclined to think that night time is just for hedonistic activities.

But this means that if we want to transform some of our City into true night time economies we need to think across planning, place making and regulation.

This means that we need to consider pop up markets in car parks.  And temporary installations. And be more liberal with parklets.

This also means that we need to entwine our fashion, food and entertainment outlets and more so be open for custom.

That means that sometimes we have to take a risk and in fact subsidise these concepts to allow for creativity and sense of destination.

With so many areas undergoing rejuvenation in Perth at present – this is the perfect breeding ground for innovative night time solutions.

The question is – are we going to seize this opportunity?

The team at PropertyESP dare you too!  The time is certainly ripe for disruption!

Coastal living the new black

Despite the resistance by coastal suburbs to welcome apartment living into their community – the research from the WA Apartment Advocacy has clearly shown that this status is going to have to change – and soon.

Of the 155 apartment owner occupiers surveyed, 15% had been living in a coastal location before then moving into their apartment (19% living on the coast).  However when asked where they would choose to live next time – 70% stated an apartment and 49% stated a coastal location.  44% also indicated they would choose riverside.  This was evenly dispersed across all age groups.

Of the 113 renters interviewed, 11% had been living on the coast and 14% moved into a coastal apartment.  But when asked where they would choose to live next 73% stated an apartment and 47% demonstrated a preference to coastal locations.

Of those living in the inner city – the owner occupiers showed a movement away from this address with a drop of 61% to 50% as this being their preferred location.

With Perth’s apartment market still very young, and limited supply in restricted locations, Perth apartment livers have chosen the best from what is on offer.

But ultimately what they want is access to the coast – which up until now has only been available to the privileged.

Councils that have therefore chosen to listen to the 5% of their population who reject apartment living have quite obviously chosen to ignore the majority who want this choice (and rightly so) for their home.

It is a message that Councils and Government will now need to start listening to.

At PropertyESP we are glad for this intelligence which raises the argument for permitting apartment living in key locations such as Trigg, Scarborough, Cottesloe and so forth.  Because without it – all we hear are the nay sayers.  But now there is a larger voice speaking up – and they are saying yay for choice!

Robust discussion needed for infill

Samantha Reece of PropertyESP recently attended the South Perth planning workshops which dealt with the proposed train station precinct and its overall design.

Now in an earlier career path, Samantha was Director of SMR and responsible for a number of community consultation projects including the Gidgegannup town centre. But what was interesting for Samantha in this case, was that the sessions were hosted by a Council and not the developer and hence this allowed for a sharing of a range of views and hence some much needed robust discussion.

Now when the South Perth Town Planning Scheme was passed in 2013 this was done so without discussing height – but rather based on the provision of a train station.  A very dangerous move because it did not deal with the elephant in the room!

As a result, when development started in 2016 and residents were faced with 39 stories – not only did they take proactive action to stop this occurring – but the train station became a dirty word (literally).

To the credit of the Council they have decided (after many inconclusive months) to now take charge by listening to all parties.

As such Samantha was delighted to see that some of the “anti development” factions were really challenged on their assumptions while developers also had a chance to revise the mandatory plot ratio for the commercial vs residential (which at present is making a number of projects in the area nonviable).

While the planning sessions were to a certain extent very much “wish list” orientated – they did allow a forum for developers and supporters of high rise, to challenge and dismiss some of the hype that the anti development factions had created.  And no doubt by allowing for this robust and sometimes very aggressive debate, the “nay sayers” were shown to be just a marginal party in the overall context.

PropertyESP wishes to congratulate the South Perth Council because they could have taken action that would have hindered their community’s growth – and yet they took the bold move to in fact challenge people’s paradigms and hence allow for the stretching of minds and concepts. Plus they did deal with the elephant – and talked height!

At the end of the day – any decision will upset some parties – but it is the deep seated understanding that you look after a whole community (and not just the vocal minority) which the South Perth Council has heeded!  As such they have set an example for others that also need to take this bold and proactive approach.  Change will not happen by chance – but rather through leadership!

Applecross apartments defy the norm

We recently conducted some research on behalf of a client of ours examining what was happening in the apartment market in Applecross and Mt Pleasant from 2011-2016.  This data was very interesting because despite having some initial setbacks, these two suburbs have once again rebounded.

Looking at 164 apartment sales in the five year period, the analysis showed that the median sale price in Applecross in 2011 was $875,000 and peaked at $1,250,000 in 2014 before settling at $1.1 million at the end of 2016.

Mt Pleasant apartment sales on the other hand started at median price point of $1,125,000 in 2011 before plummeting to $660,000 in 2013 before then rising again to $1,195,000 in 2016.

price per annum

The data also demonstrated that regardless of one, two or three bedroom apartments, there was an upswing in the median property price for both Applecross and Mt Pleasant in 2016.

bedroom sales

But what was most surprising was that being on the rivers edge (no road in front) or river front (with a road in front) reflected no price difference and as such we believe that this a paradigm that will definitely shift in years to come with the $235 million Canning Bridge redevelopment.

The data also demonstrated that rental yields were approximately 4.2% for apartments compared to 3.3% for houses in these areas.

As you can imagine this company now has good news to share with its buyers and that will only build confidence.

If you want to know what is happening in your suburb than contact the team at PropertyESP.  We delve into the nitty gritty and unveil good news!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

River and Ocean Views Command a Premium, but there’s more to it than that

Perth has long had a love affair with the Swan River and its wonderful beaches, and that is strongly reflected in property prices.

And you don’t have to be an analyst to know that properties in riverside and beachside suburbs tend to dictate higher prices and those that command views, achieve even higher prices again.

We’ve long thought of this as a view factor … and it’s true that a great view commands a premium price.

However, recent analysis performed by PropertyESP has found that it’s even a little more complicated than that.

We have recently been focusing on the apartment market in North Fremantle, South Fremantle and North Coogee … all suburbs in close proximity to the ocean or the Swan River.

What we found is that, within the water-front properties there was a distinction between those on the edge of the water and those a little further away.

In fact, properties at the water’s edge commanded a 20% (for river edge) and 13% (for ocean edge) premium in price per square metre over their ocean front counterparts.

Water’s edge properties are those properties where there is little more than a footpath or a cycle path separating the property from the riverbank or the beach.  You could walk out the front door carrying an afternoon bevvy and sit at the water’s edge to watch the passing flotilla or birdlife.

Ocean front properties on the other hand are those where there’s a little more to negotiate between the front door and the riverbank or beach when carrying your bevvy (and you may want to be wearing a little more than your swimwear).

They still have the views that people pay a premium for, but when you walk out the front door there’s a major road (likely to be busy in summer) to cross before you get to the water.

And whilst the size of the price premium varied for different sized apartments (1 bed, 2 bed and 3 bed) and in different suburbs, for the most part this rule held true.  When it didn’t, there were other factors at play, such as differences in the mix of properties for sale  etc.

So what’s the big deal?

This extra factor is something that some developers can work to their advantage with the right property.  And at PropertyESP we are all about maximising price!

The MRA’s Scarborough Redevelopment has already catalyst sales of new and modern ocean front apartment houses.

But watch carefully.  There’s the potential a little further down the coast for some interesting development …

Fremantle continues to perform

Article in last week’s Sunday Times about Fremantle apartments.  If you would like to hear all the details then contact Sam at info@propertyesp.com.au to receive an invite to our session on 9th August at 5.45pm at Bib and Tucker.

 

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